The 90% Solution

H Robert Silverstein, MD, FACC

After 47 years as a cardiologist with 200,000 patient visits, I can firmly say that vegans are my healthiest patients. I certainly agree with you it is not easy. My position is that 90% vegan which is 19 of 21 meals a week will do just fine. Foods should be, prior to preparation, ideally organic and unprocessed whole foods exactly as they grow up out of the ground and in the field.

The struggle is real and for many a constant battle.  When people find out I’ve lost over 200 pounds they all want to know how.  So I usually spout off a few words of wisdom with the knowledge that the person who asked really wasn’t listening to what was said.  I know this because my thoughts and words have already been dismissed.  Everyone wants the easy way out.  Can I take a pill to lose weight?  What if I just eat kale and nothing else?  What diet were you on?  What do you think about surgery?  I smile and walk away shaking my head.
Losing weight is hard work.  Keeping weight off is even harder.
In 1975 I dropped down to 163 after ballooning up to 370 plus.  Earlier this year I was bouncing between 200 and 205.  I was headed back to hell and decided I needed to get serious about keeping my weight off.  For me, this meant getting serious about my food choices.  So I took a deep breath and leaned in hard back to my vegetarian ways.  I started making better choices and limited my meat and dairy to about two meals a week.  Roughly 90% of my calorie intake comes from non-animal sources.
Today I was 184.4 at weigh-in.  It’s a lot better than 200 but I’ve still got a ways to go.
The Boss and I went out for lunch today.  We tried a new place called Barrios in OKC near where The Doctor lived when he was in medical school.  I am not a “foodie” but I just had to take a picture.
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Ok…I had a bite of the Roasted Chicken with Poblano Cream & Smoked Tomato Pico.  So lunch technically wasn’t completely veggie.
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The Protector 09.02.17

Being bred to work hard all day means that most Aussies are not content to be couch potatoes, although Aussies have individual characters and some are more sedate and quiet-natured than others. For the most part, however, these are high energy dogs who need a purpose in their lives-a job as it were. Owners must be committed to give these dogs the time and attention they require through play and training, for as with any dog, undirected energy can turn towards destructive behaviors such as digging and chewing. Running, jumping, and rough-housing are all a part of being a normal Aussie.

The Austrailan Shepherd Club of America

The Protector 090217

We all need a sense of purpose in our lives.  Dogs do too.

Could Big Lifestyle Changes Be Key to Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Source: Could Big Lifestyle Changes Be Key to Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Spoiler Alert

Yes.

My Father had diabetes which contributed to his early demise.

My youngest brother was diagnosed with the disease in his 20’s.  He is committing slow suicide by diet.

Way back last century when I was in my 20’s I was involved in a local professional group in Dallas TX.  The speaker I brought in was one of the country’s leading endocrinologists from UT Southwestern Medical Center.  After his talk I thanked him for his time and for enduring a dinner of rubber chicken and mushy vegetables.  But what I really wanted was free medical advice.

“Doctor, my father and brother both have diabetes.  Do you have any advice for me?”

The good doctor gave me a steely glare over the top rim of his glasses and said,

“Stay as thin as you can as long as you can.”

Boom.

 

garyskitchen.net

“You need to change the name of your food blog.”

“Why?”

“Because no one can remember Dea whatever it is you named it.”

“I didn’t name it.  Your daughter-in-law named it.  The blog name has some serious emotional attachments and…OK.  Let me think about it.”

What The Boss Wants The Boss Gets

So I’ve thought about this for around three weeks.  garycancook?  No, too long.  garysmess?  No, readers won’t know the blog is about food.  I was stumped until this morning.  I needed a new name that was bold, innovative, and easy to remember.

“What do you think about garyskitchen, no apostrophe?”

“I suggested that three weeks ago.”

Perfect.

I hope you’re not looking for this place.  Not me.  Kind of funny though.

 

 

Transformative Experiences — Quartz

Certain life choices are so significant that they change who we are. Before undertaking those choices, we are unable to evaluate them from the perspective and values of our future, changed selves. In other words, your present self cannot know whether your future self will enjoy being a parent or not.

Philosopher L.A. Paul University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Source: Transformative experiences: A philosopher who studies life changes says our biggest decisions can never be rational — Quartz

The Original Nicky Dip

When friends get together for food and drink, the conversation sometimes gets a bit quirky.  It was a small get together of six and somehow the conversation turned to dip.

“What’s in that cheese dip you guys made once.  It was awesome.”

“We didn’t have any dip tonight.  What are you talking about?”

“I had it one of the other times we were together.  It had cheese in it.”

Now that was helpful.

“What else was in it?  What kind of cheese?  What did it taste like?  What kind of chips were served?  Can you remember anything else about the dip?”

Imagine six people trying to figure out which cheese dip recipe it was based upon a single clue: cheese.  Then the quirky one who started the whole quirky conversation said,

“It also had chilies in it.”

“Oh, you must be referring to Nicky’s Cheese Dip.”

To The Box.  I found an email dated January 10, 2010 from one to all of us in the group.  There it was and here it is.

  • 2 eight ounce packages of Philadelphia cream cheese
  • 1 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 four-ounce can of chopped green chilies, drained
  • 2 ounces diced jalapeño peppers
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  1. Blend the cream cheese and mayonnaise using a hand mixer.
  2. Stir in the Parmesan, peppers and chilies.
  3. Place mixture into an ovenproof serving or baking dish.
  4. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes or until bubbly and slightly browned.
  5. Serve warm with chips.

 

Random thoughts – For the chips use tortilla chips or Frito’s (if you’re into that sort of thing).  For some strange reason I always thought this dip had a few dashes of hot sauce in it.  Add a few drops of your favorite hot sauce (trust me on this).   He Who Asked the Question will probably play with this recipe by removing some fat and calories while preserving the original flavor profile.

Do it.  And if you come up with a tasty low cal version, please share.  Let the cream cheese soften a bit at room temperature.  Start the mixer at a slow speed unless you want cream cheese and mayo splattered on the wall.

 

Strawberry Mousse

  • One package unflavored gelatin
  • 1/2 cup cold water
  • 1 cup strawberries, crushed
  • 2 egg whites
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 cup heavy cream whipped
  • 1 drop red food coloring
  1. In a sauce pan soften the gelatin in water.
  2. Stir over low heat until the gelatin dissolves.
  3. Crush strawberries, stir into the gelatin mixture.
  4. Remove from heat and allow to cool.
  5. Beat egg whites until stiff.  Gradually add sugar.  Fold in strawberry mixture.
  6. Whip cream.  Fold into the strawberry mixture.  Add one drop of red food coloring.
  7. Pour into individual molds or bowls.
  8. Garnish with fresh strawberries and chill for four hours.
  9. Serves 6-8.

“I’m going to make something light for dessert.”

“Like what?”

“Strawberry Mousse and Forgotten Cookies.”

“You forgot what?”

“No, I’m also making cookies to go with the mousse.”

“Why?”

“You’ll see.”

Tips

I crushed the strawberries with a potato masher.  You don’t want puree.  Leave some chunks.  Serve with Forgotten Cookies.  You’ll see.

Another recipe saved from its original pen and paper format.  One down and several thousand more to go.