Potential long-term negative impact of high protein diets

High protein diets may lead to long-term kidney damage among those suffering from chronic kidney disease, according to research led by nephrologist Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD, of the University of California, Irvine.

The research also indicates that a low protein, low salt diet may not only slows the progression of CKD as an effective adjunct therapy, but it can also be used for the management of uremia, or high levels of urea and other uremic toxins in the blood, in late-stage or advanced CKD and help patients defer the need to initiate dialysis.

Follow this link to the source article.

There is too much emphasis on dietary protein period.  Common sense dictates that even in the absence of CKD a low protein, low sodium diet is prudent.  Recently I’ve been reducing the sodium and surprisingly food still tastes good.  I really notice restaurant meals when too much salt is present.  Hell, I’m even eating unsalted cashews.

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Could Big Lifestyle Changes Be Key to Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Source: Could Big Lifestyle Changes Be Key to Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Spoiler Alert

Yes.

My Father had diabetes which contributed to his early demise.

My youngest brother was diagnosed with the disease in his 20’s.  He is committing slow suicide by diet.

Way back last century when I was in my 20’s I was involved in a local professional group in Dallas TX.  The speaker I brought in was one of the country’s leading endocrinologists from UT Southwestern Medical Center.  After his talk I thanked him for his time and for enduring a dinner of rubber chicken and mushy vegetables.  But what I really wanted was free medical advice.

“Doctor, my father and brother both have diabetes.  Do you have any advice for me?”

The good doctor gave me a steely glare over the top rim of his glasses and said,

“Stay as thin as you can as long as you can.”

Boom.

 

Diet quality matters not just quantity in mid-to-late-adulthood — ScienceDaily

A long term healthy, quality diet can reduce the risk of cardiometabolic conditions. Gertraud Maskarinec, MD, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology at University of Hawaii Cancer Center said, “The message that diet quality, not just quantity, matters is important for everyone who wants to maintain both a healthy body weight and a healthy metabolism.”

Source: Diet quality matters not just quantity in mid-to-late-adulthood — ScienceDaily