Veggie Burgers #2

Revised 03.11.18

  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup wheat germ, untoasted
  • 1/2 cup wheat germ, toasted
  • 1/2 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/4 cup riced cauliflower
  • 1 medium onion, carmelized
  • 1/2 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp thyme
  • 1 medium zucchini shredded
  • 1/4 cup shredded carrot
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil or trans-fat free margarine
  • 4 hamburger buns

 

Directions

  1. In a large mixing bowl, beat the eggs.
  2. Stir in wheat germ, cheese, caramelized onion, garlic powder, thyme.
  3. Place the shredded zucchini in the middle of two paper towels.  Fold the paper towels over and gently squeeze out as much moisture possible.
  4. Add the zucchini to the wheat germ mixture.
  5. Add salt and pepper to taste.  (optional)
  6. Chill for one hour in the fridge.
  7. Shape into 4 patties, 3/4-inch thick.
  8. In a nonstick saute pan, heat the oil over medium high heat.  Add the burgers and fry  until golden brown.  Flip and brown the other sides.
  9. Serve with buns and your favorite toppings.

“Why don’t you make those veggie burgers that you used to make?”

Well, nothing ever stays the same.  Not even my World Famous Wheat Germ Veggie Burgers.

Revisions ( in other words what happened?)

How is it possible a grocery store on a SUNDAY has NO MUSHROOMS?  The only plain white button mushrooms were the pre-sliced variety.  They were brown and old.  I guess I could have bought some of those fancy gourmet mushrooms for a gazillion dollars a pound.  Or I could have stopped at another store for mushrooms.  In the end I decided to just wing it.

So, no mushrooms.  Dried shiitake?  No, too Oriental for me.  In the place of mushrooms I caramelized a medium sweet onion and also added some riced up cauliflower.

In about 20 minutes we’ll find out if the substitutions works.

 

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Gluten-Free Diet? Do You Like Heavy Metal?

A sizable number of people come into my practice and tell me that they feel better on a gluten-free diet, or they think that it is healthy. This is in line with most Americans who, when surveyed, feel that gluten-free is a healthier diet.[4]

We have recent evidence to suggest, at least from a cardiovascular standpoint,[5] that this is not the case. It is no healthier than a standard diet, and it may in fact be somewhat harmful for other reasons, including the removal of a lot of dietary fibers that you would otherwise consume and the reliance on things like rice and seafood-type products. There is evidence to suggest that the latter group of foods potentially has higher levels of heavy metals.

I’ve posted in the past about the gluten-free fad.  Now we have a study from the Mayo Clinic.

 

 

Dad’s Batter for Frying

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To avoid any confusion this is MY Dad’s batter recipe.  So if you’re a sibling it’s your Dad’s recipe.  If you’re a child of mine (Guns & Roses…) this is your Grandfather’s batter on your Father’s side.  If you’re my grandchild…

I’m learning more about my Box Project all the time.  I’m not just capturing my own favorite recipes but also rediscovering family history too.

Rather than rewrite the recipe I simply posted a photo of the 3×5 index card.  This prevents me from revising the recipe as I write.  Because as I look at this recipe I can’t help but think beer not water and maybe heating up the oil before you start frying might be a good thing to do.  Or the “half glass” measure?  Trust me on this.  I had to have asked Dad for the recipe then wrote it down verbatim.

I’ve not deep fried anything at home in decades.  Not even sure anyone in the family besides my oldest grandchild would enjoy a piece of batter fried chicken.  Well, maybe he would.

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Potential long-term negative impact of high protein diets

High protein diets may lead to long-term kidney damage among those suffering from chronic kidney disease, according to research led by nephrologist Kamyar Kalantar-Zadeh, MD, MPH, PhD, of the University of California, Irvine.

The research also indicates that a low protein, low salt diet may not only slows the progression of CKD as an effective adjunct therapy, but it can also be used for the management of uremia, or high levels of urea and other uremic toxins in the blood, in late-stage or advanced CKD and help patients defer the need to initiate dialysis.

Follow this link to the source article.

There is too much emphasis on dietary protein period.  Common sense dictates that even in the absence of CKD a low protein, low sodium diet is prudent.  Recently I’ve been reducing the sodium and surprisingly food still tastes good.  I really notice restaurant meals when too much salt is present.  Hell, I’m even eating unsalted cashews.

The 90% Solution

H Robert Silverstein, MD, FACC

After 47 years as a cardiologist with 200,000 patient visits, I can firmly say that vegans are my healthiest patients. I certainly agree with you it is not easy. My position is that 90% vegan which is 19 of 21 meals a week will do just fine. Foods should be, prior to preparation, ideally organic and unprocessed whole foods exactly as they grow up out of the ground and in the field.

The struggle is real and for many a constant battle.  When people find out I’ve lost over 200 pounds they all want to know how.  So I usually spout off a few words of wisdom with the knowledge that the person who asked really wasn’t listening to what was said.  I know this because my thoughts and words have already been dismissed.  Everyone wants the easy way out.  Can I take a pill to lose weight?  What if I just eat kale and nothing else?  What diet were you on?  What do you think about surgery?  I smile and walk away shaking my head.
Losing weight is hard work.  Keeping weight off is even harder.
In 1975 I dropped down to 163 after ballooning up to 370 plus.  Earlier this year I was bouncing between 200 and 205.  I was headed back to hell and decided I needed to get serious about keeping my weight off.  For me, this meant getting serious about my food choices.  So I took a deep breath and leaned in hard back to my vegetarian ways.  I started making better choices and limited my meat and dairy to about two meals a week.  Roughly 90% of my calorie intake comes from non-animal sources.
Today I was 184.4 at weigh-in.  It’s a lot better than 200 but I’ve still got a ways to go.
The Boss and I went out for lunch today.  We tried a new place called Barrios in OKC near where The Doctor lived when he was in medical school.  I am not a “foodie” but I just had to take a picture.
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Ok…I had a bite of the Roasted Chicken with Poblano Cream & Smoked Tomato Pico.  So lunch technically wasn’t completely veggie.
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