The Tomato Plant 08.11.14

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I am patiently awaiting the ripening of three more non-USDA certified, pesticide/herbicide-free ORGANIC suburban pot farmed tomatoes.  I will not have enough fruit for a sauce.

TACOS!

 

 

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Regular Fish Consumption and Age-Related Brain Gray Matter Loss – American Journal of Preventive Medicine

via Regular Fish Consumption and Age-Related Brain Gray Matter Loss – American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Frozen fish sticks were a staple of my diet in childhood.  After growing up on seasoned breading, tons of ketchup, and imperceptible amounts of non-specific minced white fish I’m surprised I even eat fish at all.   Growing up in New Jersey was one hell of a ride.  Despite wanting to get the hell out of there as soon as I could, NJ still holds many positive memories.  Some of my favorite memories are about going to The Shore.  We didn’t go to the beach or the seashore.  We went to The Shore and where we ended up was defined by which exit on The Parkway.  And for you non-NJ readers I’m talking about the Garden State Parkway.

I didn’t get to The Shore as often as I would have liked.  But when I did make to Exit 117, then east on Routes 35 and 36, I would always find a local seafood restaurant.  After grabbing a table (you never got “seated” in the places I liked to visit) the first question was always the same:

What came in this morning?

Simply broiled, a little butter, a little lemon.  Doesn’t get any better than that.

I just hope I ate enough to have increased my gray matter volumes in the hippocampus, precuneus, posterior cingulate, and orbital frontal cortex.

Postscript

My family vacation every summer was at Exit 4B at the Admiral Motel.  Another story, another time.

 

Muesli Pancakes

This weekend I was cooking for one.  Cooking for one is fun because you get to make anything you want.  And if what you make is a disaster (not a bomb because “bomb” now means good) you toss it and never tell anyone else about your screw up.  I bought some organic muesli from Germany at the store.  I tasted it.  Muesli is one of those healthy foods that you have to do something with before you eat it.  Plain milk or soy milk won’t do it.  You need flavored yogurt or a sweet almond milk.

Or you make pancakes.

I have a guilty pleasure.  Leftover pancakes with peanut butter.

But this morning I have no guilt whatsoever.  I topped these pancakes with some fake butter, sliced bananas, and blueberries.

Memo to Kids:

This recipe is not one of your childhood pancake memories.  I just made it up this morning.

1 cup Muesli
1 cup quick oats

2 1/2 tablespoons light brown sugar

1/2 cup whole wheat flour

2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 beaten eggs
1 cup buttermilk
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 cup 2% milk

  1. Combine milks, granola, and oats.  Refrigerate for one hour.
  2. Mix remaining ingredients and stir into the granola/oats mixture.
  3. Continue mixing until you have a smooth lumpy batter (yes you read that correctly).
  4. Preheat your griddle/pan to medium/high.  Watch this heat setting as you’ll likely have to lower the heat during the process.
  5. Scoop pancake batter onto your griddle.
  6. Flip when bubbles start forming on the sides.

 

The Tomato Plant – 07.29.14

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We harvested our first tomatoes from the plant.  They actually came off the plant several days ago but I couldn’t bring myself to eat them.

But tonight that all changed.

TACOS!  Simple, fast, yummy.

The big boy got cut up.  The little one was spared.

Update 08.04.14

I broke down and ate the little one yesterday.

Cobia (Rachycentron canadum)

Cobia was on the menu tonight at a local restaurant. Cobia? Thanks to this wonderful blog post, I know now a fish.

Better Know a Fish!

Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) in the wild. (Image Source: actionfishingcharters.com) Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) in the wild. (Image Source: actionfishingcharters.com)

The cobia (Rachycentron canadum) is a carnivorous marine fish that can reach a maximum size of 6 feet (183 cm) and 150 pounds (68 kg), cruising reefs, piers and oil rigs for crabs, fish and other prey. Its large, broad head and almost shark-like body shape is unmistakable to sports anglers around the world.

Cobia are also farmed as food fish in China and Taiwan, and cobia aquaculture is under development in the United States as well. Now, researchers from the University of Maryland’s Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology have announced a breakthrough in cobia farming — by cultivating cobia using a purely vegetarian diet.

Carnivorous fish require proteins and oils from their animal diet in order to grow. As a result, aquaculture of carnivorous fish requires the use of food pellets created from grinding up small…

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The Tomato Plant 07.20.14

 

 

For all of my new readers, this is my first tomato plant.

Hence, my fascination with actually growing something.

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