Not Italian

 

Growing up I was convinced I was Italian. As a kid all of my friends were either Catholic or Jewish. Imagine your childhood in a time and place where delicious ethnic cuisine was a couple of blocks away. The businesses were always family businesses. The food was wonderful. Naturally my favorites were southern Italian and anything you’d find in a good Jewish deli (except Borscht which I never liked nor understood). Bagel with cream cheese and lox? Love it. Sunday gravy with meatballs and sausage? Isn’t this what every family makes and eats on Sundays? Didn’t everyone go to synagogue on Saturdays and church on Sundays? When I was around 12 or 13 I began my spiritual quest. We had the big Sunday meal with family but for some reason we didn’t go to church or synagogue. I was confused about faith. So I turned to The Wise One of the family for guidance.

“Father, why don’t we go to church or synagogue?”

The Wise One did not hesitate with his response.

“You don’t find God. God finds you.”

Now imagine being around 12 years old and having that thought stuck in your brain.

Faith is a funny thing. You either believe or not. So the thought that I might have some Italian blood persisted my entire life. This belief persisted until this past week. My brother got one of those DNA ancestry tests done and graciously gave me permission to share the most intimate details of our genetic heritage in a public post.

Well, I’m not Italian. And I’m not 100% of what I thought I was.  I might be Vietnamese.

Well this puts a different slant on everything.

Update 01.22.18

My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren’t My Genes Italian?

We do have the genes we inherit — 50 percent from each parent. But Elissa Levin, a genetic counselor and the director of policy and clinical affairs of Helix, says a process called recombination means that each egg and each sperm carries a different mix of a parent’s genes.

“When we talk about the 50 percent that gets inherited from Mom, there’s a chance that you have a recombination that just gave you more of the northwest European part than the Italian part of your Mom’s ancestry DNA,” she says. That’s also why siblings can have different ancestry results.

While catching up on the news I stumbled upon this article from NPR.

I feel better already.  I might still be Italian.

 

 

 

 

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2017 – Year End Review

This happened…

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I had trouble growing tomatoes but managed to grow a few bunnies.

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A new member of the family arrived.

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Another next Gen got married.

We did not move to SF for the opportunity to buy and live in a closet for $425,000.

I discovered yet another reason to quit playing guitar (watch his left hand).

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The Old Man Car lives on.

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And this guy showed up at the house.

Happy New Year to all.

 

The Protector 09.02.17

Being bred to work hard all day means that most Aussies are not content to be couch potatoes, although Aussies have individual characters and some are more sedate and quiet-natured than others. For the most part, however, these are high energy dogs who need a purpose in their lives-a job as it were. Owners must be committed to give these dogs the time and attention they require through play and training, for as with any dog, undirected energy can turn towards destructive behaviors such as digging and chewing. Running, jumping, and rough-housing are all a part of being a normal Aussie.

The Austrailan Shepherd Club of America

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We all need a sense of purpose in our lives.  Dogs do too.

garyskitchen.net

“You need to change the name of your food blog.”

“Why?”

“Because no one can remember Dea whatever it is you named it.”

“I didn’t name it.  Your daughter-in-law named it.  The blog name has some serious emotional attachments and…OK.  Let me think about it.”

What The Boss Wants The Boss Gets

So I’ve thought about this for around three weeks.  garycancook?  No, too long.  garysmess?  No, readers won’t know the blog is about food.  I was stumped until this morning.  I needed a new name that was bold, innovative, and easy to remember.

“What do you think about garyskitchen, no apostrophe?”

“I suggested that three weeks ago.”

Perfect.

I hope you’re not looking for this place.  Not me.  Kind of funny though.

 

 

Transformative Experiences — Quartz

Certain life choices are so significant that they change who we are. Before undertaking those choices, we are unable to evaluate them from the perspective and values of our future, changed selves. In other words, your present self cannot know whether your future self will enjoy being a parent or not.

Philosopher L.A. Paul University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Source: Transformative experiences: A philosopher who studies life changes says our biggest decisions can never be rational — Quartz