Powdered Peanut Butter – Prevention

Chunky, creamy, or powdered? A nutritionist chimes in about powdered peanut butter.

Source: Powdered Peanut Butter | Prevention

I saw a huge plastic container of this stuff in the store the other week.

I also saw peanut butter flavored beer in another store this week.

Think I’ll stick with regular old fashioned salted roasted peanuts and a nice craft beer that tastes like…beer.

This RD loves it!

 

 

Oceana Study Reveals Misrepresentation of America’s Favorite Seafood

 

Yikes!

Oceana Study Reveals Misrepresentation of America’s Favorite Seafood.

“I’ve seen cute little cleaner shrimp in aquariums and while scuba diving, but never expected to find one on a grocery shelf,’” said Dr. Kimberly Warner, report author and senior scientist at Oceana. “We really know very little about the shrimp we eat, and the information we do get may not be trustworthy. Consumers have a right to know more about the shrimp they purchase in order to make more responsible choices.”

Among the report’s other key findings include:

  • The most common species substitution was farmed whiteleg shrimp sold as “wild” shrimp and “Gulf” shrimp.

  • Forty percent of the 20 shrimp species or categories collected and identified were not previously known to be sold in the U.S.

  • No samples labeled as “farmed” were mislabeled, while over half of the samples labeled simply “shrimp” were actually a wild-caught species.

  • A banded coral “shrimp,” which is an aquarium pet not intended to be consumed as food, was found commingled with another unidentified shrimp in a bag of frozen salad-sized shrimp purchased in the Gulf.

  • Overall, 30% of over 400 shrimp products surveyed in grocery stores lacked information on country-of-origin, 29% lacked farmed/wild information and one in five did not provide either.

  • The majority of the 600 restaurant menus surveyed did not provide the diner with any information on the type of shrimp, whether it was farmed/wild or its origin.

Going Greens: Edmond’s Upward Harvest lives the gospel of local, sustainable growing practices – News OK

via Going Greens: Edmond’s Upward Harvest lives the gospel of local, sustainable growing practices | News OK.

Upward Harvest Home.

I was at the market the other day and I saw potted plants strategically located throughout the fresh produce section.

Why is the grocery store selling plants?  Indoors, no less.

I really didn’t give it much more thought until I stumbled across this article in the local paper.

How cool is it to have an organic hydroponic farm in your town?  Read the article and check out the video.

Kind of makes the earthquakes bearable.

Sort of.

Cobia (Rachycentron canadum)

Cobia was on the menu tonight at a local restaurant. Cobia? Thanks to this wonderful blog post, I know now a fish.

Better Know a Fish!

Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) in the wild. (Image Source: actionfishingcharters.com) Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) in the wild. (Image Source: actionfishingcharters.com)

The cobia (Rachycentron canadum) is a carnivorous marine fish that can reach a maximum size of 6 feet (183 cm) and 150 pounds (68 kg), cruising reefs, piers and oil rigs for crabs, fish and other prey. Its large, broad head and almost shark-like body shape is unmistakable to sports anglers around the world.

Cobia are also farmed as food fish in China and Taiwan, and cobia aquaculture is under development in the United States as well. Now, researchers from the University of Maryland’s Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology have announced a breakthrough in cobia farming — by cultivating cobia using a purely vegetarian diet.

Carnivorous fish require proteins and oils from their animal diet in order to grow. As a result, aquaculture of carnivorous fish requires the use of food pellets created from grinding up small…

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